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4Africa

Update on Congo Ebola Outbreak

Update on Congo Ebola Outbreak

Here is a recent update on activities in the Congo. Ebola continues to be a concern, and activities on the ground continue to impact efforts to control the outbreak.  

The Lingering Effects of Ebola

The Lingering Effects of Ebola

Ebola was always suspected to have long-lasting effects.  However, it is now apparent that those fears were well-founded. Cases of the virus re-activating in previously infected patients are now appearing, and therapies are coming slowly or still stalled in the development pipeline. This story highlights the real impact of Ebola. 

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Outbreak of Lassa Fever in Nigeria

Outbreak of Lassa Fever in Nigeria

 “Nigeria’s Lassa fever outbreak has reached record highs with 317 laboratory confirmed cases, according to figures released by the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) this week...”

Is there a path forward to treat Ebola?

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We really need to focus on how we address diseases that affect the entire global community. Ebola, as a disease, while still in Africa is certainly something that can affect other communities across the globe. Right now, many treatment strategies are still sitting on the shelf... We all understand the risks of developing new medicines, but when big pharma cannot find a business case to get behind something like this, we all have a problem. Let's start a new hashtag #globalconscience4Africa 

Nature put out an interesting article on technologies sitting on the shelf that could address infectious diseases in general...  When will enough people globally or at least in developed countries die from Ebola so that making a vaccine for it becomes profitable to big pharma given the significant investment required in research and development on the front end? The economic factors driving the lack of efforts have not been sufficiently discussed in mainstream media. The focus has been more on whether and how it might spread. Public pressure on big pharma is non-existent because we view this as an African disease and therefore not important. We accept that there is no cure but don't discuss the politics and economics of vaccine development. African lives at stake, the potential global spread of the disease, and the incredibly high mortality rate make finding a treatment/cure paramount.

A live updated feed on Ebola

Ebola virus outbreak: live - Telegraph